Advantages and Disadvantages of Timber Cladding | Different Types of Timber Cladding Profiles

Advantages and Disadvantages of Timber Cladding | Different Types of Timber Cladding Profiles

What is Timber Cladding?| Advantages and Disadvantages of Timber Cladding | Best Timber for Exterior Cladding | Different Types of Timber Cladding Profiles | Timber Cladding Alternatives | Exterior Wood Cladding Ideas

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1 What is Timber Cladding?| Advantages and Disadvantages of Timber Cladding | Best Timber for Exterior Cladding | Different Types of Timber Cladding Profiles | Timber Cladding Alternatives | Exterior Wood Cladding Ideas

What is Timber Cladding?

Timber cladding is a type of cladding that typically includes boards of timber. It is installed on the exterior of a home and may be used for the entire exterior, for specific portions, or in combination with other exterior claddings.

Timber cladding typically includes boards of timber. It is installed on the exterior of a home and may be used for the entire exterior, for specific portions, or in combination with other exterior claddings.

Timber is primarily used in new construction and renovations in place of more traditional wood types such as plywood, and plywood.

Timber cladding is a type of exterior cladding for buildings that adhere to natural and sustainable architectural principals.

Timber cladding is most commonly used on new construction, but can also be used on old construction.

Timber cladding can be made from any type of wood, but the most common woods are cedar, Western red cedar, and Douglas fir.

Timber cladding is a superb choice for both commercial and residential property. A particular advantage of timber cladding is that it is a natural material, and is created from sustainable sources.

The growth of timber cladding stems from a new passion for a natural lifestyle, a desire for the authentic, and for a sense of place.

Timber cladding is available as either a board or a panel, and can be a solid board or an engineered board.

Treated and Untreated Timber

The difference between the price of treated and untreated timber is a big deal. Untreated timber is cheaper, but with constant exposure to water it is likely to rot.

This can mean that timber’s lifespan may be only five years in some areas.

Treated timber lasts much longer, and can last up to 6-7 years in some cases. Growth rings are much wider and the timber is denser, meaning it will last longer.

Untreated timber will degrade in a year or two because of the moisture it absorbs.

What Is the Best Timber for Exterior Cladding?

Wood is a very practical and attractive material for exterior cladding. There are many styles of wood, such as cedar, pine, poplar, and cypress. Each offers their own unique characteristics and benefits.

For example, cedar, pine or cypress can offer the best natural resistance against insects and rot. While poplar, which is hard, is often used in areas that are more prone to extreme cold weather.

Exterior timber cladding must not only look good, but it must also be dimensionally stable and naturally durable.

A good exterior cladding timber should be able to withstand all the severe seasons throw at it, including sun, rain, wind, and snow, as well as being resistant to insect and fungal assault.

Softwoods are the most popular choice for exterior wood cladding since they perform well at a low cost, but there are some beautiful hardwoods that work well as well.

Here are some of the greatest forms of wood cladding to consider whether designing an eye-catching business project or undertaking some home improvement.

1. Western Red Cedar

Western Red Cedar, a highly durable softwood with a beautiful, warm reddish-brown tint, has become a wildly popular cladding material in recent years. Many people believe it is the best species for cladding.

This resinous species naturally repels all outdoor evils since it is lightweight, stable, inexpensive, weather resistant, and has excellent workability and nailing capabilities.

Whether you’re cladding a house or the exterior of a large real estate property, Western Red Cedar will not disappoint.

Western Red Cedar color varies from reddish to pinkish brown with a darker red/brown stripe.

Straight grain with a medium-to-coarse texture and rot resistance is extremely good.

It has Excellent machining workability qualities; easily accepts screws and nails.

2. ThermoWood

Thermowood blends stunning brown tones with exceptional natural durability if you’re looking for a premium timber cladding that’s a little darker.

This wood is slightly denser than Western Red Cedar, but not as dense as Siberian Larch.

As a medium-density thermally-modified softwood pine, this one-of-a-kind product provides stability, less shrinkage, movement (swelling), cupping, and distortion.

Thermowood, which comes in a variety of profiles, is also resistant to screws and nails.

The grain is often straight. Texture ranges from medium to fine. The color is a rich brown tone that runs throughout.

Moderate rot resistance and excellent machining workability qualities; accepts screws and nails easily.

3. European Oak

Of all the hardwoods cladding, European Oak is the most affordable, but many people believe it to be the best cladding. This species has a warm brown color that will blend well with almost any exterior tint.

This wood is extremely resistant to rot and decay, and can be cut and used for indoor projects where rot won’t be an issue.

European Oak becomes much darker as it ages, with some forms turning a gorgeous charcoal black. Natural European Oak features a reddish coloring.

This timber cladding is hard, dense, and heavy. This species releases a lot of sap, which contains tannin-heavy chemicals.

This makes the wood naturally resistant to rot and decay. European Oak has excellent nailing and screwing capabilities.

European Oak features interlocking grains that are straight or slightly wavy, with a coarse texture that is easy to work with tools.

4. Accoya Wood

Accoya wood is a fantastic alternate to teakwood. This premium timber cladding is resistant to decay and insects, and has excellent durability.

It also resists warping, shrinking, and rotting, making it one of the most stable exotic hardwoods in the world today.

Oak trees that have been chemically-modified into Accoya wood feature a rich brown tone with unique hints of a red or purple coloring.

5. Siberian Larch

Siberian Larch is a fantastic alternative to Canadian Hemlock, and is also an affordable choice for cladding.

This exotic hardwood is extremely resistant to rot and decay, while remaining lightweight, strong, and naturally resistant to warping.

Once grown in Scandinavia, Siberian Larch has become very popular due its exceptional durability.

This species features a reddish-brown color that matches beautifully with the exterior of a building or property.

6. Black Walnut

Black Walnut is a dense hardwood that’s extremely hard and strong, and has incredibly long life.

It can be used as building material for very high-end projects, and does have the ability to retain its color intensity with age.

This species of wood is highly resistant to insects, decay, warping, and rot. It also resists shrinking and swelling over time, making it one of the most stable exotic hardwoods in the world today.

7. Brazilian Cherry

Brazilian Cherry is an exceptionally strong, light weight wood that’s resistant to rot and decay, while also resisting warping, shrinking, and swelling. This species features a beautiful brown color with hints of red.

8. Padouk

Padouk is an exotic softwood with a reddish-brown coloring. It’s extremely hard and durable, as well as lightweight (it can be used indoors).

This species is resistant to rot and decay, making it one of the most stable exotic hardwoods in the world today.

Padouk is an affordable wood that can be used for a wide variety of cladding, and has a rich, reddish-brown coloring over the entire body.

9. Pine

Pine is one of the most commonly used species for cladding. It’s naturally resistant to rot, decay, warping, and splintering—all great qualities for exterior wood cladding.

Pine features an aromatic wood scent with a fine texture. This hardwood features a rich brown tint that beautifully matches with modern exterior tints.

Pine features interlocking grains that are straight or slightly arched, and a medium to coarse texture.

10. Cedar

Cedar is another popular species for exterior wood cladding. It’s naturally resistant to decay and warping, making it a good choice for people who want to use their cladding for an extended period of time.

Cedar features an aromatic wood scent with a fine texture. This hardwood has a reddish-brown color that looks good on any exterior site or building.

11. African Mahogany

African Mahogany is a softwood that still has a medium density and high durability, making it an excellent choice for exterior wood cladding.

This species features a beautiful brown to red coloring, with some forms turning into an almost black shade.

12. Sycamore

Sycamore is one of the most commonly used exotic hardwoods to make timber cladding. This species is denser than Western Red Cedar, but not as dense as Siberian Larch or Eastern White Pine.

Sycamore features a soft, light brown or grey color that blends well with most exterior tints. This species varies from straight grain to interlaced grain, with a medium to coarse texture.

13. Maple wood

Maple is another great cladding option for people looking for high-end cladding. This species is naturally resistant to rotting, warping, shrinkage, and deformation—all qualities that make it an excellent choice as an exterior timber cladding material.

Maple features a dark brown color with hints of natural red coloring. The grain of this hardwood is interlocked, with a medium to coarse texture.

14. Oak wood

Oak is an attractive and affordable species for cladding, and has many qualities that make it an excellent choice for cladding projects.

This species naturally resists rotting, warping, decay, warping, and shrinking—all great qualities for exterior wood cladding on any building or property.

Oak features a strong brown color with hints of red coloring. The grain of this hardwood is interlocked, with a medium to coarse texture.

15. Kebony Wood

Kebony is a hardwood that’s naturally resistant to any kind of rotting, warping, or decay. This species is lightweight, strong, and elastic. It has also been known to resist shrinking over time—another great attribute for exterior wood cladding on any building or property.

Kebony features a rich black color with a reddish tinge. The grain of this species is interlocked with a coarse texture.

16. Garapa Wood

Garapa wood is a rare hardwood that’s extremely hard and durable, and has a naturally high resistance to rotting. This species features a reddish-brown color with hints of black coloring.

Garapa is an extremely durable hardwood that’s resistant to warping and shrinking over time.

This exotic species features a medium brown color with hints of red tint. It has wood grains that are interlocked, with a coarse texture.

17. Douglas Fir Wood

Douglas Fir is an excellent choice for exterior wood cladding, as it’s resistant to decaying, warping, rotting, and shrinking. This species features a beautiful light brown color with hints of red tinting.

Douglas Fir has a medium-to-wide interlocking grain with coarse texture. The wood is naturally resistant to rotting and warping over time.

18. Cedarwood Wood

This species is widely used in timber cladding projects because it’s resistant to rotting and decay, while also being lightweight.

Cedarwood is naturally resistant to warping, shrinking, and rotting—all great qualities for exterior wood cladding.

Cedarwood features a beautiful reddish-brown color, with hints of black coloring throughout. The grain is interlocked, with a coarse texture.

19. Black Locust Wood

This species is very heavy and durable and has many properties that make it an ideal choice for exterior timber cladding. This species is resistant to rotting and decay, making it suitable for exterior timber cladding.

Black Locust features a medium-brown coloring with hints of black coloring throughout. This species is interlocked, with a coarse texture.

20. Teakwood

Teak has been used in many timbers cladding projects because it’s both resistant to rotting and decay, while also being lightweight. This species features a beautiful brown color, with hints of red coloring.

Teakwood is a durable hardwood that’s resistant to warping and shrinking, making it an excellent choice for exterior cladding material on any building or property. The grain of this species is interlocked, with a coarse texture.

21. Holly

Holly is an inexpensive and naturally resistant species that can be used for exterior cladding. This species features a light brown color with hints of red tinting.

22. Redwood Wood

Teak is another common species for exterior cladding. It’s resistant to decay, rotting, and warping, while also being lightweight. This species features a lovely dark brown color with hints of red coloring.

Teakwood is an extremely durable hardwood that’s resistant to warping and shrinking over time. The grain of this species is interlocked, with a coarse texture.

Redwood is a very strong hardwood that’s about as dense as oak, and very lightweight—all making it an excellent choice for exterior cladding projects.

This species naturally resists decaying, rotting, warping, and shrinking—all great qualities for exterior wood cladding on any building or property.

Redwood features a reddish-brown color, with its grain being coarse and interlocked.

23.  Southern Yellow Pine Wood

This hardwood is resistant to rotting, warping, and decay—all great qualities for exterior wood cladding on any building or property. This species features a light brown color with hints of red coloring.

Southern Yellow Pine is an attractive species for this purpose because it’s lightweight and resistant to oxidizing (so it won’t turn brown over time). The grain is interlocked, with a coarse texture.

24. Ipe Wood

Ipe wood is a hardwood species that’s naturally resistant to rotting, warping, and decay. This species features an attractive dark brown coloring, with hints of red tinting throughout. The grain of this species is interlocked with a coarse texture.

25. Black Walnut Wood

Black Walnut is another beautiful hardwood option for exterior wood cladding because of its naturally resistant qualities to rotting, warping, and decay. This species features a dark brown coloring with hints of red tinting throughout. The grain of this wood is straight with a coarse texture.

26. Bitternut Hickory Wood

Bitternut Hickory is a hardwood that’s naturally resistant to rotting, warping, and decay—all great qualities for exterior wood cladding on any building or property.

This species features an attractive brown color, with hints of red coloring in the sapwood. The grain of this wood is straight and coarse.

27. Cypress

Cypress is an attractive species for exterior cladding because of its many naturally resistant qualities to rotting, warping, and decay.

It also has a natural resistance to water absorption and offers a long lifespan for exterior wood cladding on any building or property.

This species features a light brown color with hints of red tinting throughout. The grain is straight with fine texture.

29. Blue gum

Blue gum is a hardwood species that’s resistant to rotting and decay, as well as warping. This species features a light brown color with hints of red tinting throughout. The grain is straight, rough, and coarse in texture.

30. Poplar

Poplar is a very dense species with a high resistance to rotting, warping, and decay. This species features an attractive light brown color with hints of reddish-brown coloring throughout. The grain of this wood is straight and coarse in texture.

Different Types of Timber Cladding Profiles

1. Shiplap Timber Cladding

Shiplap Cladding is one of the most popular timber cladding. It is a planed (smooth finish) softwood cladding board.

It is suitable for exterior work such as horizontal boarding of sheds, summerhouses, garages and house walls.

It is green pressure treated to ensure it is protected from the weather and will last as long as possible.

Ship Lap timber cladding is strong and offers a tight seal, preventing water penetration. Shiplap cladding is a flat, smooth finish in a wide variety of colours and grain patterns.

2. Interlocking Timber Cladding

Interlocking cladding allows you to create panels or boards that are interchangeable, providing flexibility.

It is a type of timber cladding where the boards join with pins and glue. This allows for an easy panel to be made up from one board, saving time and money for the contractor or homeowner.

3. Tongue & Groove Timber Cladding

T&G cladding is made from high quality timber, so it is durable and long lasting. The tongue and groove ranges come in a variety of styles and colours.

Corners can be nailed or glued for a professional finish, including door frames. T&G boards are fairly smooth, allowing for any paint to be applied easily. The boards offer fantastic protection from the weather.

4. Carriage Tongue & Groove Cladding

A hardwood carriage tongue and groove is used on the roof to cover tiles. It is made from wood and is built in a similar way to a tongue and groove cladding board.

It is a very strong material that allows the roof tiles to lie flat from top to bottom. The end of the carriage tongue and groove features a tight joint for the tilework, so there are no gaps between the tiles.

5.  Loglap Timber Cladding

Loglap is a type of timber cladding that is very easy to install as it comes with the backing attached. It is held in place using nails, screws or adhesive.

The loglap ranges include end lap, log groove and shiplap boards.

6. Parralelipiped Timber Cladding

Parallelipiped timber cladding is a type of wood cladding that is the same width throughout its length. It is a flat hardwood timber which is ideal for the installation of parrallel ceiling tiles.

The cladding is made from high quality wood and will give a long life to the parralleltile paneling installations.

7. Log Patterned Timber Cladding

Log Pattern Cladding has been around for many centuries and has been used in many construction projects throughout the world.

It is very durable and long lasting. Log Pattern Cladding is mainly used for the installation of log cabin kits.

The boards are able to be constructed from a large variety of timbers, with their colours ranging from a light brown to a dark brown.

8. Contemporary Vertical Cladding

Contemporary Vertical Cladding is suitable for use on interior cladding applications. It offers a smooth finish and is the perfect choice to bridge that gap between an old and a new house.

This type of timber cladding consists of vertical boards which are fixed using nails or screws. This cladding comes in a wide variety of colours that suit any home or building.

9. Feather-edge timber cladding

Feather-edge timber cladding is a modern version of traditional log cladding. The boards are cut to fit the space left in between the logs for a finished look, providing a natural feel to the timber cladding.

The feather edge boards are made from naturally decay-resistant hardwoods such as cedar and pine.

10. Behring Timber Cladding

Behring Cladding is one of the most expensive types of timber cladding, but it’s very effective for its high quality.

This type of cladding provides a smooth, seamless finish. It is made from a wide variety of species, so it can be installed into any type of building.

11. Composite Timber Cladding

Composite timber cladding is one of the most attractive timber cladding types on the market when it comes to both looks and durability.

This timber cladding is suitable for both interior and exterior applications. The boards feature a tongue and groove profile with a natural finish, but you can also choose from a wide variety of colours.

12. Twist Timber Cladding

Twist timber cladding is a type of wood cladding that comes in many different colours and shades.

It is an extremely durable material that is resistant to decay, rot and weathering. It features straight grain so it is strong enough to be used for walls and floors as well as interior and exterior applications.

13. Splayed Timber Cladding

Splayed Timber Cladding is an excellent material for any flooring project that needs to be done. It consists of boards which are fixed with nails or screws.

The boards have a tongue and groove profile and can be fitted in any room, hallway, kitchen or dining room.

They come in a wide variety of sizes and colours so you’re able to choose the perfect type of cladding for your house, office or business.

14. Charred Timber Cladding

Charred timber cladding is a type of timber cladding that is made using dark hardwood boards. It has been burnt to create a subtle but elegant finish to the wooden board and it can be fitted easily into any indoor or outdoor space.

It comes in many shapes and sizes, so you will be able to find just the right colour for your home. The material is made from durable wood species, including oak, ash and pine.

15. Wickes Timber Cladding

Wickes Timber Cladding is a type of wood cladding that features smooth, vertical boards. It is made from a very durable material that can be used both indoors and outdoors.

This timber comes in many different colours which are suitable for any home or business, especially if you want to cover up an old wall before painting it a new colour.

The cladding is very easy to install as it comes with nails and screws included.

16. Apl vertical timber cladding

Apl Vertical Timber Cladding is very hard wearing and durable for any project that you want to do.

It comes in a variety of different sizes which are suitable for any home or office space, even if you want to make some changes to the design of the room.

This type of cladding has a tongue and groove profile and comes in many different colours, so it will compliment any wall that is in need of a new look.

Timber Cladding Alternatives

Timber cladding is a hard, long lasting material that will add a natural feel to any room. It is suitable for both interior and exterior wall applications because it provides the perfect insulation properties.

It is very easy to install; however, you should always have a professional or contractor do this type of work for you.

Timber cladding will give you maximum protection against weathering and moisture, which will save you money on your electricity bills in the long run.

It is very important to inspect your timber cladding before you install it so that you will know if it is suitable for your home.

If you want to repair wood damage or simply want to improve the look of your home while increasing its value, timber cladding will do the job.

The are several timber cladding alternatives. These include;

1. Concrete Cladding

Concrete is a very durable, long lasting and washable timber cladding. It comes in many different colors so you are able to choose the one that matches your home.

This cladding is very easy to install on both interior and exterior walls. However, you will need to hire a contractor who has the experience and knowledge in this type of work.

2. Clay Tile Cladding

Clay tile is very popular when it comes to cladding as it has excellent thermal properties. It can be fitted in both interior and exterior applications, providing a smooth, seamless finish.

It can withstand any weather so it will keep the heat or cold out of your home and office.

Clay tiles are very easy to install and you don’t have to worry about anything because they come with screws for fixing into the wall.

3. Clapboard Cladding

Clapboard Cladding is an excellent choice if you want a natural, environmentally friendly solution for your timber cladding.

The boards are made from sustainable pine so they are durable and weather-resistant.

This type of cladding can withstand any type of weather so your home won’t be damaged by the environment.

It is available in a wide range of colours and textures, making it very versatile and easy to match with other timber cladding styles.

4. Cedar Cladding

Cedar Cladding is a type of timber cladding that comes with a natural, rough texture. It can be used on both interior and exterior wall applications, providing protection against the elements.

This type of cladding is very durable so it will last you for many years to come.

Cedar boards come in a wide variety of colours and shades so you will be able to choose one that matches your home’s decor or paint job.

5. PVC Cladding

PVC Cladding is a type of timber cladding that is made from recycled plastic. It is very environmentally friendly and provides excellent protection against the elements. This material is very durable and will last for many years to come.

PVC cladding comes in a wide variety of colours, including blue, white, brown and grey so you can choose the one that will match your home’s decor or paint job. It is very easy to install and all you have to do is screw it into place on the wall.

6. Synthetic Timber Cladding

Synthetic timber is a type of cladding that features a non-porous surface that resists moisture and heat.

This material can be used for both interior and exterior applications, being waterproof and weatherproof.

It comes in a variety of colours so you can choose one that will match your home’s decor or paint job.

The material is available in a wide range of sizes, shapes and profiles so you can do whatever type of project you are working on.

7.  Metal Cladding

Metal Cladding is made from a variety of different materials, including aluminum, steel and zinc. It is easy to install and available in many different shapes and styles.

You can get it in flat, corrugated sheets or panels so you can use it for either interior or exterior applications. This type of cladding comes with its own set of screws so you will be able to put it up with ease.

8. Shrink Wrap Cladding

Shrink Wrap Cladding is a type of timber cladding that creates an excellent air cushion around the building, keeping heat or cold out.

It is a very durable material so it will last you for many years to come. It comes in several different colours so you can choose one that matches your home’s decor or paint job.

Shrink wrap cladding also features horizontal grooves which will hide any gaps and uneven surfaces, giving your project an even more professional look to it.

9. Wall Paper Cladding

Wall paper cladding is another type of timber cladding that comes with a soft, flexible surface. This type of material will give your home that natural look that you are looking for.

It comes in many different colours so you can choose the one that matches your home’s decor or paint job.

Wallpaper Cladding is very easy to install on both interior and exterior walls and it also has foam insulation inside, allowing the building to be very energy efficient.

10. Woven Cladding

Woven Cladding is a very simple type of timber cladding that is made from polypropylene or polyethylene.

It comes in a wide range of colours, making it very versatile and easy to match with other types of cladding materials.

It is also very strong, being able to withstand both wind and water damage. This type of timber cladding will come with all the necessary screws for fixing into place on the wall.

Advantages and Disadvantages of Timber Cladding

Advantages of Timber Cladding

There are a lot of benefits of timber cladding. They include;

1. Timber Cladding Acts as Insulation

Timber cladding is effective for both heat and sound insulation, trapping in heat and ensuring sound does not escape.

Better at retaining heat than concrete, steel, and aluminum, timber cladding is both functionally and aesthetically ideal for buildings.

Effective insulation from timber cladding and shingles reduces the reliance on heating and cooling systems in a building, promoting environmentally friendly energy usage.

2. Timber Cladding is Sustainable

Timber Cladding is a highly sustainable building material, taking into account that it can be made using principally renewable plant and animal materials.

While many modern building materials are manufactured from fossil fuels such as petroleum or coal, timber cladding is typically sourced almost entirely from these sources.

3. Timber Cladding helps to Regulate Temperature

Timber cladding produces an optimal thermal envelope in a building which is tight-fitting, yet allows for the maximum amount of natural light.

The addition of thermal mass, in the form of timber cladding and insulation, greatly reduces the need for artificial climate control.

4. Timber Cladding helps to Reduce Maintenance Costs

The maintenance costs associated with timber cladding is limited to cleaning and repainting as needed. The fibres in timber have a nature that repels dust and dirt, facilitating easy cleaning of wood surfaces.

5. Timber Cladding provides Lasting Value & Aesthetic Appeal

Timber cladding is extremely durable, requiring minimal maintenance over prolonged periods of time. With a long life-span, timber cladding is a cost-effective solution for any building project.

Timber cladding is available in multiple colours for both interior and exterior applications. Its rich natural beauty enhances the overall design of any building.

6. Timber Cladding is an Eco-Friendly Product

Timber Cladding is a highly eco-friendly material, as it can be recycled and reused multiple times.

When timber cladding is recycled, the material can be transformed into new wood products that have comparable or even superior qualities to the original.

Disadvantages of Timber Cladding

1. Timber cladding can be relatively expensive.

Timber cladding can be relatively expensive if compared with other types of wall cladding, but when considering its longevity, it’s worth the initial investment.

2. Timber Cladding adds weight to building materials.

The weight of timber cladding isn’t an issue for conventional homes and apartment buildings, but it is a concern for high-rise buildings and other tall structures where weight can be a prohibitive factor in the construction process.

3. Timber cladding is susceptible to decay in wet areas.

Timber cladding is susceptible to decay from exposure to water over long periods of time. The rate of decay depends on the type of timber used and the climate it’s exposed to.

4. Timber Cladding can be difficult to install.

Timber cladding is more difficult to install than other types of walls cladding as it requires a greater degree of skill and expertise, as well as special tools such as hammer-drill.

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