What Does a Mother Title Mean? Individual Title Deed vs. Mother Title

What Does a Mother Title Mean? Individual Title Deed vs. Mother Title

What Does a Mother Title Mean?

A mother title deed, also known as a mother deed, is the original title deed of a piece of land or property before it is subdivided into smaller holdings or plots. It serves as the primary legal document that traces the origin and ownership of the entire property.

This document is crucial for establishing the historical ownership and transactions related to the property.

A mother title deed typically covers the entire property and includes details about the location, road, door number, block, and ward numbers, among other relevant information.

Individual Title Deed vs. Mother Title

An individual title deed and a mother title, also known as a master title or parent title, refer to different types of property ownership documents:

  1. Individual Title Deed: An individual title deed is a legal document that specifies ownership rights to a specific portion or unit of a larger property, typically found in small plots, condominiums, apartment buildings, or housing complexes. It provides details about a single unit, such as a specific apartment, townhouse, or plot of land, within the larger property. Individual title deeds grant individual property owners exclusive ownership and control over their specific unit, and they are often used in multi-unit or multi-story developments.
  2. Mother Title (Master Title): The mother title, also known as the master title or parent title, is a legal document that covers the entire property, which can include multiple units or parcels within a development. It serves as the primary title document for the entire property, and from it, individual title deeds are usually derived. The mother title outlines common areas, shared facilities, and the overall legal framework for the entire property, including the boundaries and any restrictions that may apply to all unit owners within the development. Individual title deeds are typically derived from the mother title and represent ownership of specific portions within the larger property.

The individual title deed pertains to a specific unit or parcel within a larger property, while the mother title pertains to the property as a whole and provides the legal structure for the development.

Individual title deeds are usually derived from the mother title to establish ownership of individual units or parcels within the property. It is issued for each subdivided plot after the original land has been divided.  This document provides precise information about the specific piece of land, including its size, location, and the name of the owner

What Is The Difference Between Title Deed, Sale Deed, And Mother Deed While Buying A Plot?

When buying a plot of land, it’s essential to understand the differences between a title deed, sale deed, and mother deed:

  1. Title Deed: The title deed is a legal document that proves ownership and legal rights over a piece of land. It typically displays information about the property’s owner, type, size, and dimensions. The title deed serves as evidence of your ownership of the land.
  2. Sale Deed: A sale deed is a document used in property transactions to transfer ownership from a seller to a buyer. When a sale deed is registered, it becomes a legal proof that the title of the property has been transferred to the buyer. It essentially acts as a title deed once registered.
  3. Mother Deed: The mother deed is the original document on the basis of which the seller derived their title to the property. It may also go by the terms “sale deed” and “title deed.” This document is crucial for tracing the history of ownership and proving the rightful ownership of the property.

In short, the title deed is the document that demonstrates your ownership, the sale deed is the legal proof of property transfer, and the mother deed is the original document showing the property’s history of ownership. These documents play important roles in property transactions and establishing ownership.

 

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