What Is Loss Factor In Commercial Real Estate? Meaning & Example.

What Is Loss Factor In Commercial Real Estate? Meaning & Example.

What Is Loss Factor In Commercial Real Estate? Meaning & Example.

Loss factor, also known as load factor or core factor, refers to the difference between rentable square footage (RSF) and usable square footage (USF) in commercial real estate. RSF includes all the space that a tenant leases, including common areas and shared spaces, while USF refers to the area that only the tenant can use for their business operations.

The loss factor is calculated by subtracting the USF from the RSF and dividing the result by the RSF. For example, if a commercial space has an RSF of 7,000 square feet and a USF of 5,000 square feet, the loss factor would be 28%. This means that the tenant is paying for 100% of the space but can only use 72% of it.

Understanding the loss factor is crucial for tenants when searching for suitable office space and negotiating leases.

Key Takeaways:

  • Loss factor refers to the difference between rentable square footage (RSF) and usable square footage (USF) in commercial real estate.
  • The loss factor is calculated by subtracting the USF from the RSF and dividing the result by the RSF.
  • Tenants need to understand the loss factor when searching for office space and negotiating leases.
  • The calculation of the loss factor can vary depending on the standards set by organizations like BOMA and REBNY.
  • Strategies like comparison shopping and negotiating based on USF can help reduce the impact of the loss factor.

How To Calculate Loss Factor

To calculate the loss factor of a commercial space, you need to know the RSF and USF. Subtract the USF from the RSF to determine the difference in square footage. Then, divide this difference by the RSF and multiply by 100 to get the percentage loss factor. For example, if the RSF is 7,000 square feet and the USF is 5,000 square feet, the calculation would be: (7,000 – 5,000) / 7,000 * 100 = 28% loss factor. This calculation helps tenants understand how much space they are actually paying for and how much they can use.

The formula for calculating the loss factor is simple and straightforward:

Loss Factor = (RSF – USF) / RSF * 100

Let’s break it down further with an example:

RSF (Rentable Square Footage) USF (Usable Square Footage) Loss Factor Calculation
7,000 sq ft 5,000 sq ft (7,000 – 5,000) / 7,000 * 100 = 28%

Understanding the loss factor calculation is essential for tenants to make informed decisions about their commercial leases. It allows them to compare different spaces and negotiate lease terms based on the usable square footage rather than the rentable square footage. By calculating the loss factor, tenants can ensure they are paying for the space they actually need and maximize the value of their lease agreements.

Who Decides How Loss Factor is Calculated?

In the world of commercial real estate, the calculation of loss factor can vary depending on several factors, including location and industry standards. Two prominent organizations in the United States that play a role in defining loss factor standards are the Business Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) and the Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY). Understanding the differences in their methodologies is crucial for tenants when evaluating office space options and negotiating leases.

BOMA and REBNY use different starting points and measurements when determining loss factor. BOMA measures from the centerline of the window, while REBNY measures from the exterior of the window. These variations can result in significant differences in the overall loss factor calculation. Additionally, there may be discrepancies in what spaces are considered part of the rentable square footage (RSF) and usable square footage (USF), further impacting the loss factor percentage.

It is important for tenants to be aware of which standards are being used in their specific location and negotiation process. This information can help them make more informed decisions and understand what they are paying for when leasing office space. By being knowledgeable about different loss factor calculations, tenants can better navigate the complexities of commercial real estate and ensure they are getting the most out of their leased space.

 

How to Reduce the Effects of Loss Factor

When it comes to commercial real estate, loss factor is an unavoidable aspect that can impact your leasing experience. However, there are strategies that you can implement to minimize its effects and ensure you get the most out of your space.

First and foremost, comparison shopping is key. Take the time to evaluate multiple spaces and look for the one with the lowest loss factor. Keep in mind that location and property style can affect the loss factor, so consider these factors when making your decision.

When negotiating your lease, it’s important to focus on rent based on usable square footage (USF) rather than rentable square footage (RSF). By doing so, you can ensure that you are only paying for the space you can actually use. Additionally, requesting a total monthly rental cost can help you avoid any unexpected charges.

Another tip is to inquire about a renewal option in your lease. By including this provision, you can protect yourself against potential space remeasurement and resulting price increases. It’s always wise to have a clear understanding of your lease terms and the potential impact of loss factor.

FAQ

What is loss factor in commercial real estate?

Loss factor, also known as load factor or core factor, refers to the difference between rentable square footage (RSF) and usable square footage (USF) in commercial real estate. It represents the portion of space that a tenant pays for but cannot use for their business operations.

How do you calculate loss factor?

To calculate the loss factor of a commercial space, subtract the USF from the RSF to determine the difference in square footage. Then, divide this difference by the RSF and multiply by 100 to get the percentage loss factor.

Who decides how loss factor is calculated?

The calculation of the loss factor can vary depending on the authority or organization that defines the standards for measuring commercial real estate. In the United States, prominent organizations like the Business Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) and the Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY) play a role in defining loss factor standards.

How can I reduce the effects of loss factor?

There are several strategies that tenants can employ to minimize the impact of loss factor. These include comparison shopping to find spaces with low loss factors, negotiating rent based on USF, asking for a total monthly rental cost, inquiring about a renewal option, and seeking the assistance of a tenant broker.

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