What Is The Difference Between Window Tint And Window Film?

What Is The Difference Between Window Tint And Window Film?

What Is The Difference Between Window Tint And Window Film?

Window tint is a type of film that is applied to the windows in order to darken them. Window film is a type of film that can be applied to the windows in order to provide a number of different benefits, such as UV protection, privacy, and security.

Many people confuse window tinting and window film, but they are actually referring to two different products. Window tinting involves changing the shade or color of the windows, whereas many window films are clear and serve primarily to save energy and provide UV protection.

Tinting Windows:

Because it is usually impractical in appearance for homes, window tinting is more common in commercial buildings or businesses than in residential areas. However, using slightly tinted window film can sometimes add privacy to a home in a crowded neighborhood and can sometimes blend in with the exterior look of the home.

Window tinting tends to block some of the natural light entering a space, which can be advantageous in office settings where glare is an issue. There are numerous colors to choose from that will also provide privacy because they are difficult to see through from the outside.

Many offices choose this type of window film to provide their employees with more privacy from passersby or nearby buildings that may be visible.

Window Film:

Window film is by far the most popular option for homes. While there are a few slightly tinted versions available, clear window film is the most popular choice because it does not alter the exterior of the home.

Even clear window film has numerous advantages. While it does not provide privacy, it does provide excellent UV ray protection, preventing up to 99 percent of harmful sunlight from entering your home and potentially damaging your floors, furniture, and walls.

The primary reason that many homeowners choose to install window film is for energy savings. Window film can reduce your heating and cooling bills by up to 60%, which means that the investment in adding this great product to your home pays for itself in as little as 2 to 5 years and continues to save energy.

 

Can I Install 3M Window Film Myself?

No, 3M Window Films must be applied by a professional; only authorized 3M Window Film Dealers are thoroughly trained and experienced in performing high-quality work. As a result, our customers will reap the benefits of 3M Window Films while also benefiting from the 3M warranty.

A professional contractor should be able to provide you with insurance and they will install thousands of 3M Window Films every year. Choosing a reputable contractor is critical because they are trained and knowledgeable in their craft and appreciate the quality of 3M Window Films.

In contrast to other window film companies, 3M is closely monitored by a team of quality control personnel who ensure that everything we produce meets the highest possible standards for safety, performance, durability, and image integrity.

In considering what type of window film may work best for your home or office, keep in mind that there are high-quality films as well as low-quality films on the market today.

Window film is a delicate product that requires a quality installation by an experienced, certified window film contractor. Although there are DIY kits, we do not recommend this option as it can negatively impact the appearance of your windows and even leave them vulnerable to sun damage.

If you are in need of window film for your home or business, contact a professional window film contractor who will be able to help you choose the best product for your needs and install it with precision.

All 3M window films and repairs come with a limited lifetime warranty backed by our industry-leading service teams; in fact, there are hundreds of locally operated 3M Authorized Contractors who will be happy to help you with your window film project today.

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